What Can I Do to Secure My Mobile Device?

The volume of cyber threats to mobile computing devices continues to increase as new applications and devices proliferate. McAfee reports that there were more than two million new mobile malware samples in 2013. Symantec reports that nearly 40% of mobile device users have experienced mobile cyber crime in the past 12 months. Some experts estimate that nearly 10% of applications sold on particular platforms are malicious. Most mobile malware gets installed when a user visits an infected website or downloads a malicious application, or clicks on a link or an attachment.

How can you protect yourself? Here’are some helpful tips for keeping the information on your mobile device safe.

  1. Lock the device
    An easy way for malware to get on a device is for someone to manually install it. Locking your device with a strong PIN/password makes unauthorized installation of applications more difficult.
  2. Install applications from trusted sources
    Users must recognize that some applications may be malicious. If an app is requesting more permissions than seems necessary, do not install it, or uninstall the application. Only install applications from trusted sources.
  3. Don’t jailbreak your device
    To “jailbreak” or to “root” a device means to bypass important controls and gain full access to the operating system. Doing this will usually void the warranty and can create security risks. This also enables applications, including malicious ones, to bypass controls and access the data owned by other apps.
  4. Keep operating systems and apps up-to-date
    Manufacturers, telecommunications providers, and software providers regularly update their software to fix vulnerabilities. Make sure your device’s operating system and apps are regularly updated and running the most recent versions.
  5. Use a mobile security software solution
    Install antivirus software, if available.
  6. Block web ads and/or don’t click on them
    Malware can find it’s way onto your mobile device through a variety of methods, including advertisements. The malicious advertisements are called “malvertisements.” Mobile ads accompany a significant amount of content found in mobile applications. Whether you find them annoying or amusing, cyber criminals have turned their attention toward using them to spread malware to unsuspecting users. What makes these “malvertisements” so dangerous is the fact that they are often delivered through legitimate ad networks and may not appear outright spam, but can contain Trojans or lead to malicious websites when clicked on. Some mobile devices have software that can block harmful sites.
  7. Don’t click suspicious links and attachments
    While it may be difficult to spot some phishing attempts, it’s important to be cautious about all communications you receive, including those purported to be from “trusted entities”. Be careful when clicking on links or attachments contained within those messages.
  8. Disable unwanted services/calling
    Capabilities such as Bluetooth and NFC can provide ease and convenience in using your smartphone. They can also provide an easy way for a nearby, unauthorized user to gain access to your data. Turn these features off when they are not required.
  9. Don’t use public Wi-Fi
    Many smartphone users use free Wi-Fi hotspots to access data (and keep their phone plan costs down). Smartphones are susceptible to malware and hacking when leveraging unsecured public networks. To be safe, avoid logging into accounts, especially financial accounts, when using public wireless networks.

Fraud Alert: Heartbleed Bug

We are aware of the concerns surrounding the “Heartbleed Bug” (OpenSSL vulnerability).

Please be aware that our web site uses web servers, which are not affected by the Heartbleed Bug. Our technology personnel have been assessing all systems to determine if there are any other known vulnerabilities, and will continue to review those until we are confident we have covered all areas of concern.

If any vulnerabilities are identified, and action needs to be taken, we will notify customers immediately.

Help Us Celebrate National Ag Day!

Today is National Agriculture Day, a day organized by the Agriculture Council of America, a nonprofit organization dedicated to increasing the public’s awareness of agriculture’s key role in modern society.

Ag Day is the perfect time to recognize and celebrate the abundance provided by modern agriculture. We salute and thank all of you involved in the agriculture industry. We know that food, clothing and other daily necessities don’t just arrive in stores, but rather, go through many steps on the way to our tables and homes.

Central National Bank is proud to have served local farmers and ranchers and agri-businesses for the past 130 years. Money for Life isn’t just a tagline for us… we intend to continue to do all we can to assist our agriculture clients in any way we can.

Coming Soon – New Mobile Apps!

We’re in the process of finalizing and releasing new and improved mobile apps! Over the next week, you will see a new version of our apps available in the Google Play Store and iTunes. Once the new app is available, you can download and install it and then uninstall the previous version. You’ll also be prompted within the current version of the app to download the new version of our app once it’s available.

The new apps will feature a much-improved user interface as well as additional features such as CNB branch location listings and debit card integration! Stay tuned for more information, and thanks for your patience as we go through this process.

A screenshot of the “Home” screen on the new iOS app is shown below, first, and the Android version, second.

Fraud Alert: Government Grant Scam

Customers have reported receiving telephone calls regarding Government Grant Scams. As usual, we like to let you know when a specific type of scam is popular, so you can be better prepared to avoid these situations yourself.

The scammer will say something like,  “Because you pay your income taxes on time, you have been awarded a free $12,500 government grant! To get your grant, simply give us your checking account information, and we will direct-deposit the grant into your bank account!”

This is fraud, plain and simple. For more information on Goverment Grant Scams visit the FTC’s website at http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0113-government-grant-scams#.UwT_r-ulg0k.email

Fraud Alert: Automated Telephone Calls

We’ve had several reports that customers are receiving automated telephone calls from a restricted number.  The call informs the customer that there has been fraud on their account, to continue press 4 (or another number). These are phishing calls designed to get customers to provide account information. Please do not provide account information if this happens. Contact your local branch with questions or concerns.

Celebrate 130 Years with Us!

October 2014 marks the 130th year of service for Central National Bank, but we’re really excited, so we’re celebrating all year. Watch for specials and other fun stuff throughout the year, there’s bound to be something that interests you!

For January…

 

To sign up contact your local branch.

Fraudsters May Take Advantage of Target Data Breach

There have been daily news stories about the Target data breach and how it may affect shoppers. This is a great time for scammers to send out phony emails from Target pretending to help. What they are really trying to do is to trick you into giving them your personal information.

If you get an email that says it is from Target, look for the following to make sure you don’t get scammed.

  • If any email asks for your personal or financial information, it is most likely a scam.
  • If you receive an email that asks for your debit or credit card number, do not reply. No legitimate business will ask for your personal information through unsecure methods like email.
  • If there are links in the email, do not click on them.
  • Scammers create links and sites that look like the real deal. These phony sites can install viruses to your computer or direct you to spoof sites that exist to steal your information. Hovering over a link can reveal a deliberately misspelled web address, or a completely different destination. To be safe, you should typed the URL directly into your browser.
  • Be aware that scammers may send emails promising a free gift card, a new tablet or computer, or even a job in exchange for your personal information. Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is too good to be true.

Target Data Compromise

Target released a statement today confirming a breach which affects nearly 40 million credit and debit card holders.

Anyone who shopped at a Target Store between November 27, 2013 and December 15, 2013 could be at risk. As a result of this situation, Central National Bank has decided to reissue new cards and PIN’s to all customers impacted by this breach. We also encourage you to monitor your accounts closely.

Central National Bank takes the protection and security of our customer information very seriously and we are actively monitoring accounts for suspicious activity.  If you notice something suspicious on your account please contact us immediately. We can immediately inactivate your card and work with you to dispute the fraudulent charges.

To learn more about this situation read Target’s official statement at https://corporate.target.com/discover/article/Important-Notice-Unauthorized-access-to-payment-ca