ATMs: PIN in Reverse?

We’ve had a number of questions from customers lately who’ve noticed a message circulating Facebook regarding the ability to send out an emergency signal from an ATM. Specifically, being able to punch in your PIN backwards which then alerts the police. This message is not new, in fact, it started circulating the Internet in 2006.

So the big question… Is it true? Without a doubt… NO. At least not at any Central National Bank ATM in the state of Kansas or Nebraska. Trust us. We know what we’re talking about.

So how about all of the other hundreds of thousands of ATMs in our country? Well… the next time your friend posts something like that as their status update, or forwards you an email, feel free to send them to
www.snopes.com/business/bank/pinalert.asp

This site is great for debunking all Internet circulated myths. In fact, if you read far enough down the page it will tell you the origin of the myth. What we didn’t know, is that this myth is rooted in some truths. Over the last few years, there have been several attempts to make this myth a reality; including a bill to the Kansas state senate’s Financial Institutions and Insurance Committee. The bill died in 2004.

Now I KNOW you’re asking yourself why. Why, would something that seems like such a good idea get shut down? Why, would banks not put an emergency signal into all ATMs?

Well, the answer is simple. Do you think you could remember your PIN with a gun to your head/back? I can hardly remember my PIN when I am in line at the store. The pressure is just too much. Especially if everyone behind u me has two items and I’m trying to stuff all 112 items back into my cart so the bread and eggs don’t get squished. I don’t know about you, but I can’t imagine trying to remember my PIN BACKWARDS if my life depended on it!

The article on Snopes points this scenario out as well as a few others. But, the one that makes the most sense to me is that triggering an emergency signal could put the ATM user in more danger than simply withdrawing the money and reporting the crime later. Not every criminal is dumb – so they’re likely to notice that something strange is going on.

Do yourself a favor and set people straight when the myth starts circulating again.

OCC Issues Alert on Fraudulent Letters

The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency yesterday issued an alert about fraudulent letters — distributed via email, fax, or postal mail — involving funds purportedly under the control of the OCC and other government entities.

“The letters may indicate that funds are being held by the Halifax Bank, London, England, and that the recipient will be required to pay a mandatory express service charge to have the funds released,” the OCC said. The letters are “being sent to consumers in an attempt to elicit funds from them and to gather personal information to be used in possible future identification theft.”

The letters also contain forged signatures of former OCC officials and a fictitious email address. The agency emphasized that any document claiming that the OCC is involved in holding any funds for the benefit of an individual or entity is fraudulent. “The [agency] does not participate in the transfer of funds for, or on behalf of, individuals, business enterprises or governmental entities,” the OCC said.

Read the OCC alert

View an example of the fraudulent letters

Phishing Reminder

During the holiday season, cyber criminals aggressively create new ways to steal money and personal information. Scammers use many techniques to fool potential victims, including conducting email and texting schemes posing as their bank.

Please remember that Central National Bank will not use email or text messages to communicate issues with your debit card or on-line banking. If you receive a suspicious email or text, do not click on any link included in the communication. Instead call the Bank and we will happy to answer questions or concerns.

CNB Account Named Best Business Checking Account

Our Business Value Checking account has recently been named one of the “Best Free* Business Checking Accounts” by the “nerds” at the popular financial advice company, NerdWallet.com. The people at NerdWallet strive to provide quality financial information and advice to consumers so they are better equipped to make decisions about finances, travel and higher education. Check out the article on their website at http://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/2012/best-business-checking-accounts/

*Please visit our website for a full description of our fees that may be associated with this account.
Please Note: Central National Bank does not endorse or monitor the content of any web sites linked to from this site, and it has no control over each site’s content or offerings. The operator of the site may have a privacy policy different than Central National Bank. Please note that NerdWallet does not have a financial relationship with Central National Bank.

Attn: Cash Management Customers

 

Our service provider reports seeing increased activity with a malware screen takeover, which is targeting token users. This particular malware variant will prompt a user to input account and/or token data, which then results in another screen prompt indicating that the user will be unable to access the account for 24-hours while maintenance is performed.  While the user is detained on the fake “maintenance” screen, it allows the fraudster enough time to take over the session and commit fraud.

 

Phishing Emails Reported

We are receiving reports of phishing emails being sent from what appears to be a NetTeller email address customer _service @cm.netteller.com with the subject line of NetTeller Watch Notice. These are bogus emails trying to get you to click on the embedded NetTeller access link. These emails are NOT coming from NetTeller or Central National Bank. Should you receive an email, DO NOT to clink on the link. Instead, permanently delete the email.

“Skimming” Awareness

Have you ever heard of skimming? Have you ever been a victim?

If you have, then you know that a skimmer is almost entirely undetectable by users. A skimmer is an electronic device that can be placed over a card slot on an ATM, a gas pump, and other machines that have a slot to insert your debit or credit card. At Central National Bank we’re careful to check our ATMs regularly for these devices, but there are many other places you use your card, so here’s a few tips – published by the FBI - for protecting yourself from theft via skimming.

  • Inspect the card reader slot before inserting your card. Be suspicious if you notice anything loose, crooked, or damaged. Scratches and adhesive/tape residue can also be warning signs.
  • When entering your PIN, block the keypad with your hand to prevent possible hidden cameras from recording your number.
  • If possible, use ATMs and payment terminals at inside locations (less access for criminals to install skimmers).
  • If your card isn’t returned after the transaction or after hitting “cancel”, immediately contact your card provider.

If you notice any of these signs and are suspicious of foul play, contact the company/owner of the terminal as soon as possible and do not insert your card into the slot. If it’s an ATM, contact the financial institution that owns the ATM. Better safe than sorry.

Find a penny, pick it up!

I’m not sure how much luck has to do with saving, but this childhood phrase comes to my mind every time I see a penny lying on the ground. And this in turn got me to thinking about how much money I would have if I had saved those pennies!

So here is my challenge. Starting the day you read this post, what if, from now on you put aside all of your change every day and kept it in a jar. How much money do you think you would have at the end of a year, and what would you then do with that money once it accumulated? Hmm.. lots of possibilities there!

Okay, so now what if you don’t use cash? What if you use your debit card all the time but would still like to save the change? Well, with Central National Bank it is possible to do just that! It’s called the It Makes ₵ents! program. It Makes ₵ents! allows me to round up my debit card transactions to the nearest dollar (all the way up to $10.00) and have the change put right into my savings account!! So, not only am I saving money without even realizing it, but I am also earning interest on it!

Being enrolled in It Makes ₵ents! also means that there’s no minimum balance requirement on the savings account it’s tied to. As long as it’s hooked to It Makes ₵ents! and there’s a flow of change being deposited into the account you’ll never receive a service charge for being below the minimum.

If that still isn’t enough incentive, maybe this will help you decide… Starting September 1st, 2012 we are launching a new savings match program. If you are enrolled in It Makes ₵ents! the bank will match 5% of every penny saved!*

 

*See the complete program details and restrictions at: www.centralnational.com/personal/imc.asp

Article courtesy of Jodi – Guest Blogger

Cautionary Reminder

Have you brushed up on your information pertaining to Phishing scams? Now might be a good time – see our prior posts here, here and here. We’ve seen an increase in phishing scams lately and would like to take the opportunity to remind our customers that:

We have your information on file. We will NEVER call you and ask for account numbers, social security numbers, or access codes.

If you have recently given any of this information over the phone, to a representative claiming to be from Central National Bank, please call our toll free number 1-888-262-5456. Our call center would be happy to assist you in protecting your account from phishers.

BBB Issues Nationwide Warning

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) has issued a nationwide warning about a new scam claiming that President Obama will pay consumers’ utility bills through a federal program.

How the Scam Works:

Consumers are being contacted via telephone, fliers, social media and text messages and various other means with claims that President Obama is providing credits or applying payment to utility bills.

To receive the money, scammers claim to need the consumer’s Social Security Number (SSN), financial institution routing number and account number. In return, the consumers are given a fraudulent financial institution routing number to use in order to pay their utility bills through an automated telephone service.

The payment service initially seems to accept the payment but then declines it within a few days of finding the banking information to be invalid. The consumer’s bill has not been paid and his/her SSN and personal financial information have been compromised.

Helpful Tips:

The BBB offers the following tips to help consumers avoid becoming victim of this scam:

  • Never provide your SSN, credit card number or banking information to anyone who calls you, regardless of whom they claim to be representing.
  • If you receive a call claiming to be your utility company and feel pressured for immediate payment or personal information, hang up and call the customer service number on your utility bill.
  • Never allow anyone into your home to check electrical wiring, natural gas pipes or appliances unless you have scheduled an appointment or reported a problem. Also, ask the employee for proper identification.
  • Think safety first, always. Do not give in to high pressure tactics for information over the phone or in person.